On being Germanized

Image if you will … it’s 20:15 on a Sunday evening in Germany. Anywhere in Germany. Anywhere at all in Germany really. The show is on. Tatort. The familiar flickering of the super sized boob tubes cast their long familiar ambient spells and stun their captive audience into a mute fascination. It begins …

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It’s only TV I know … and TV is furniture but it’s the fun kind of furniture to sit and watch. Germans love watching their TVs. Especially on Sunday evenings when Germany’s longest running crime series airs. Tatort first aired in November 29, 1970 and continues to this  day.Funny thing is I remember this show from it’s black and white days when I was still a younger lad.

And I believe that now that I’ve begun to settle into the weekly viewing habit, and rather anticipating the next show that I’m beginning to become more German. You see, it’s tradition in many households to watch this sometimes riveting crime scene murder investigation.

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Watch Tatort on Sundays and investigate together here with us at 20:15

And yes it is a little different than the run of the mill ‘mercan crime shows. I find that this show in particular makes the viewer think a bit as she/he tries to figure out the current case and what makes this show rather interesting is the fact that often an unanticipated twist takes you places you weren’t anticipating. That’s one of the reasons I like the show.

No, I don’t always like the episodes but that’s to be expected but I’ve come to like this or that detective duo and the particular chemistry that make them work, or not work.

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And in the months preceding my move back to Germany a couple of years ago, I used Youtube to watch as many of the online shows as I could to get the language back into my ear and head. Now that that’s in there my Sunday evenings are scheduled, ha.

It’s always interesting to discover what kind of a story and writers came up with. See you on  the couch next Sunday evening; German style.

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Happy Cadaver Day

It’s a holiday today. It is also a Thursday. That means that some of my work colleagues are using a bridge day (Bruecken Tag) to build a longish weekend. I forgot to plan ahead and  hence I  work tomorrow.

Frohnleichnam – Corpus Christi (it’s a feastday I hear, but unsure what to eat) 

It is only a holiday in the Bundeslaender of Baden-Wuerttemberg, Bavaria, Hesse, Northrhine-Westphalia, Rhineland Palatinate und Saarland.

Corpus Christi (feast)

Celebrated 60 days after Easter Sunday.

Not too sure what the feast consists of. But am pretty sure that most Germans I’ve spoken to and I presume many others as well do not have the faintest notion as to what this holiday actually means or represents. Now I belong to that select group of ‘don’t know’ people. I will try to enlighten you and myself.

It seems that Juliana de Cornillon, living in a convent style arrangement in Liege, Belgium kind of wished for another holiday after lent, one especially dedicated to the ‘Blessed Sacrament‘ for which she had a particular groove on.

Perhaps she did or did not have repeating ‘visions’ of Christ for 20 or so years; which she kept secret, in which she allegedly had been instructed to plead  establishment of the feast of Corpus Christi. She managed to convince those with some special clout and there you have it, Bishop Robert instituted the new holy day in 1246.

I leave it to you dear reader to delve deeper into the who what where and why of this feast dayhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blessed_Sacramenthttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blessed_Sacrament.

Note: Not to be confused with the city of same name in the US state of Texas.