Canadiana 102

There are a wide variety of trees in Canada, tall, short, wide, skinny, and mostly green. I’d hazard a guess that there are Brazilions of them. More than I could count. Hell, I can’t even remember how many I personally stuffed into mother earths’ skin the summer I tree planted. The west is generally green all year round, what with all those evergreen trees congregating in dense groups called forests or woods. If you’re looking for the pretty colorful Canadian fall calendar type scenics, you will find it more in the central to the eastern regions of this land.

However many trees types that make up our countries lumber supply littering this contries’ garden wildernesses, national parks, provincial parks and city parks as permanent shade givers and landscape features, there is a place where those suckers simply don’t grow well or at all.

Separating the bit of Canada with lots of trees and the bit without is something called the ‘Tree Line’; see the squiggly green line on the graphic for visual aid.

Squiggly Northern Canadian Tree-Line (image curtesy of http://www.ece.gov.nt.ca website)

It might all be north as far as you’re concerned or south depending on where you are reading this from right now, but if you’re north of that line, you’ll know it because you can’t climb the shrubbery excuses that pass for trees up there. It’s the frosty cold grip of the climate up there that tends to be a tree killer because it freezes the tree sap, zapping them to death with the freezer effect.

There also are other types of tree lines, but I wanted to draw your attention to this green one in particular.

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